Tuesday, August 19, 2008

American, again

The other day prof. Grady and I went to a place called Irving's. As we were adding half $ half to our coffee, we started talking about the new cups they were using. MUCH better insulated... just SO MUCH BETTER, really. We leave and start walking down the street and keep talking about the cups and how wonderful they are and how great it is to be able to just HOLD your coffee and not feel like your hand is about to turn into charcoal and fall off.

That's when we realize we have already slipped back into being American. We expect fast, reliable, high-quality service + convenience, convenience, convenience everywhere we go.

I've got mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, I feel like I'm turning into a more uptight version of myself. I want things and I want them NOW. On the other hand, however, this uptight version of me is significantly more... relaxed. So I'll think twice before I complain about this.

4 comments:

  1. The only thing that really matters is to take note of where you are. I usually have a few difficult days every time I switch continent: in Europe and especially in Bulgaria you don't have the convenience. In America you don't chat with the waiter.

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  2. In America, also, you don't get to drink beer on your lunch break. Just sayin'.

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  3. How true... I always get annoyed at myself when I realize that I expect to have things as convenient as they are in the US elsewhere in the world. While the reality is that most of the world is not like that and it still operates just fine. So I just stopped being demanding, especially when I am in a third world country, which happens a lot. What to do when a close person who grew up in a communist country is now extremely uncompromising of inconveniences though?... Uptight is the right way to describe them...

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  4. Petya: Yes, that's one of the saddest features of American culture. You get plenty of beers after work though :)

    @hereanndthere: Never trust people who grew up in a communist countries...

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